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View Full Version : Which Fighting Game do you recommend and whats separates them?



xamcronus
8th January 19, 18:21
I saw many experienced fighting gamers in this forum so I decided to post my question here instead of reddit :)

I tried to get into fighting games before with SFV but didn't really like it. Mainly because I had to learn the matchups, the moves of the other fighters, the frame data to know when Iam in plus and which of my moves I could use to punish etc. So I ended up spending more time in training mode and decided that this is not fun to me.
Since there are so many fighting games out there I never even heared about I want your help to find a decent game for me.

If we have someone here who has played multiple fighting games I'd also love to hear what actually separates them. For the recommendation tho I'm not interested games like I described above. I'm sure some of you enjoy that but as I said I couldn't enjoy it and gaming should be fun in the first place right? :)

JQuest313
9th January 19, 14:52
Are you playing fighting games competitively or casually?

xamcronus
9th January 19, 16:22
I dont play fighting games at all right now but I wanna start and this is my starting point right here ;)

justframe
9th January 19, 17:26
I tried to get into fighting games before with SFV but didn't really like it. Mainly because I had to learn the matchups, the moves of the other fighters, the frame data to know when I am in plus and which of my moves I could use to punish etc. So I ended up spending more time in training mode and decided that this is not fun to me.

Unfortunately, there aren't any popular games out right now where you can be completely ignorant of all these things and still do well. They are fundamentals that are important to any fighting game.

That having been said, it sounds like you made the mistake of trying to 'cram' when you played SFV. If you try to learn too much at once, you'll end up getting frustrated when you inevitably forget something or struggle to apply everything you learned in a real match. What I do when I'm playing a new fighting game I want to get good at is play online matches for one, maybe two hours tops. Then afterwards if there was a move I didn't know how to deal with, or a character I struggled against, I go into practice mode and look at whatever I didn't understand. Once I feel like I know what to do in that situation, I turn the game off until the next day. This keeps you from spending too long in practice mode and lets you learn as you play. Studies have shown that the best way to learn is to do it in small chunks, and then sleep on it. That works for fighting games too.

As far as what game to play, SFV is generally considered an easy game in terms of how long it takes to get good at it, and you already bought it, so you might give it another try. Soulcalibur VI is also a pretty beginner friendly game. If you have a Switch, you might want to try Smash Ultimate. That game can be played in an advanced way, but it can also be played in a very beginner friendly way and it has a much more casual player base than other fighters.

You may also find that fighting games just aren't for you. Ultimately no matter what game you pick it could end up taking hundreds of hours to get decent at it. If the investment doesn't seem worth it to you then fighting games might not be your cup of tea. But there are ways to make those hours of investment fun, its not all just sitting in practice mode for hundreds of hours.

JQuest313
9th January 19, 17:36
So you got your 2D fighters like SFV, Mortal Kombat, Injustice, 3D style like Tekken, Dead or Alive, and you got your 2D tag team based like Marvel vs. Capcom, and Dragonball Fighterz just to name a few. I would YouTube these to see what catch your interest. All of them have they pros and cons but most of them are fun. What are you playing these on by the way?

JQuest313
9th January 19, 17:39
Unfortunately, there aren't any popular games out right now where you can be completely ignorant of all these things and still do well. They are fundamentals that are important to any fighting game.

That having been said, it sounds like you made the mistake of trying to 'cram' when you played SFV. If you try to learn too much at once, you'll end up getting frustrated when you inevitably forget something or struggle to apply everything you learned in a real match. What I do when I'm playing a new fighting game I want to get good at is play online matches for one, maybe two hours tops. Then afterwards if there was a move I didn't know how to deal with, or a character I struggled against, I go into practice mode and look at whatever I didn't understand. Once I feel like I know what to do in that situation, I turn the game off until the next day. This keeps you from spending too long in practice mode and lets you learn as you play. Studies have shown that the best way to learn is to do it in small chunks, and then sleep on it. That works for fighting games too.

As far as what game to play, SFV is generally considered an easy game in terms of how long it takes to get good at it, and you already bought it, so you might give it another try. Soulcalibur VI is also a pretty beginner friendly game. If you have a Switch, you might want to try Smash Ultimate. That game can be played in an advanced way, but it can also be played in a very beginner friendly way and it has a much more casual player base than other fighters.

You may also find that fighting games just aren't for you. Ultimately no matter what game you pick it could end up taking hundreds of hours to get decent at it. If the investment doesn't seem worth it to you then fighting games might not be your cup of tea. But there are ways to make those hours of investment fun, its not all just sitting in practice mode for hundreds of hours.

This is what I wanted to say too. Lol

xamcronus
9th January 19, 18:42
Unfortunately, there aren't any popular games out right now where you can be completely ignorant of all these things and still do well. They are fundamentals that are important to any fighting game.

That having been said, it sounds like you made the mistake of trying to 'cram' when you played SFV. If you try to learn too much at once, you'll end up getting frustrated when you inevitably forget something or struggle to apply everything you learned in a real match. What I do when I'm playing a new fighting game I want to get good at is play online matches for one, maybe two hours tops. Then afterwards if there was a move I didn't know how to deal with, or a character I struggled against, I go into practice mode and look at whatever I didn't understand. Once I feel like I know what to do in that situation, I turn the game off until the next day. This keeps you from spending too long in practice mode and lets you learn as you play. Studies have shown that the best way to learn is to do it in small chunks, and then sleep on it. That works for fighting games too.

As far as what game to play, SFV is generally considered an easy game in terms of how long it takes to get good at it, and you already bought it, so you might give it another try. Soulcalibur VI is also a pretty beginner friendly game. If you have a Switch, you might want to try Smash Ultimate. That game can be played in an advanced way, but it can also be played in a very beginner friendly way and it has a much more casual player base than other fighters.

You may also find that fighting games just aren't for you. Ultimately no matter what game you pick it could end up taking hundreds of hours to get decent at it. If the investment doesn't seem worth it to you then fighting games might not be your cup of tea. But there are ways to make those hours of investment fun, its not all just sitting in practice mode for hundreds of hours.

You nailed it. I was sitting in practice mode going through all characters and their moves for hours. Your approach sounds really good I never thought about it.
I'm going to take a look at all the games you guys mentioned in this topic and see which looks interesting to me. There are some good sales offers right now <3

Since I got you veteran warriors here and we are on cronusmax let me ask another question: how do you guys use cronus in fighting games? I've seen recent posts with scripts and it seems popular to use LS and RS sticks for combos, dashes etc. Ive also seen scripts where face buttons and dpad buttons are used as combo starters and on button release the script would be canceled. This is really cool. However I wonder if scripting is useful or hindering / or when are they useful and when hindering? What are the Dos and Donts when it comes to scripting in fighting games?

JQuest313
9th January 19, 19:09
You nailed it. I was sitting in practice mode going through all characters and their moves for hours. Your approach sounds really good I never thought about it.
I'm going to take a look at all the games you guys mentioned in this topic and see which looks interesting to me. There are some good sales offers right now <3

Since I got you veteran warriors here and we are on cronusmax let me ask another question: how do you guys use cronus in fighting games? I've seen recent posts with scripts and it seems popular to use LS and RS sticks for combos, dashes etc. Ive also seen scripts where face buttons and dpad buttons are used as combo starters and on button release the script would be canceled. This is really cool. However I wonder if scripting is useful or hindering / or when are they useful and when hindering? What are the Dos and Donts when it comes to scripting in fighting games?

I play most of my fighting games on the Xbox One, so me using the Dpad is easy for me. The thing with me is even tho I use CM for combos, I still always go into practice mode and train, and learn combos and moves and so forth. This is because my response time might be quicker pressing buttons than using the analog. So it all depends on the situation in game.

justframe
9th January 19, 21:01
Since I got you veteran warriors here and we are on cronusmax let me ask another question: how do you guys use cronus in fighting games? I've seen recent posts with scripts and it seems popular to use LS and RS sticks for combos, dashes etc. Ive also seen scripts where face buttons and dpad buttons are used as combo starters and on button release the script would be canceled. This is really cool. However I wonder if scripting is useful or hindering / or when are they useful and when hindering? What are the Dos and Donts when it comes to scripting in fighting games?

I think scripting can be useful especially when learning a new character. Having immediate access to combos can definitely give you a head start when learning a new character or game, because it allows you to focus all your practice time on learning more important things instead of learning combos. It also makes playing multiple characters a lot easier.

As far as how to make a fighting game script, I think the most important thing is how easy it is to use. This means that the layout for a script will look different between different games and even different players. For most 3D fighters, a RS/LS and shoulder button layout will work better than using the face buttons. Whereas I think using the face buttons/d-pad for combos is a better choice for 2D fighters. The goal should be to make using the tools provided by the script as intuitive as possible, so that you don't get situations where you miss an opportunity because the script you needed to activate was mapped to something that was hard to reach in time.

The other thing that I think is important is using combos that are simple. Especially when you're first starting out making fighting game scripts, trying to create the most difficult, max damage combos is going to make an already hard thing to do even harder on yourself. Plus since the timings on these combos tend to be stricter, they tend to be more susceptible to lag. Its ultimately up to personal taste, but I prefer combos that I can use over and over again to combos that are high damage and flashy but too situational because they burn too much meter, use too many important resources, etc.

xamcronus
9th January 19, 21:16
I think scripting can be useful especially when learning a new character. Having immediate access to combos can definitely give you a head start when learning a new character or game, because it allows you to focus all your practice time on learning more important things instead of learning combos. It also makes playing multiple characters a lot easier.

As far as how to make a fighting game script, I think the most important thing is how easy it is to use. This means that the layout for a script will look different between different games and even different players. For most 3D fighters, a RS/LS and shoulder button layout will work better than using the face buttons. Whereas I think using the face buttons/d-pad for combos is a better choice for 2D fighters. The goal should be to make using the tools provided by the script as intuitive as possible, so that you don't get situations where you miss an opportunity because the script you needed to activate was mapped to something that was hard to reach in time.

The other thing that I think is important is using combos that are simple. Especially when you're first starting out making fighting game scripts, trying to create the most difficult, max damage combos is going to make an already hard thing to do even harder on yourself. Plus since the timings on these combos tend to be stricter, they tend to be more susceptible to lag. Its ultimately up to personal taste, but I prefer combos that I can use over and over again to combos that are high damage and flashy but too situational because they burn too much meter, use too many important resources, etc.

Thank you for your detailed answer once again man. I really like how you simplify things. I couldn't ask for more. I got all my answers I wanted. Thank you all

KS212
10th January 19, 04:05
From my perspective as a player who actually performs combos manually before I script them (for my own damn laziness :P), when learning a new fighting game you should always focus on learning the game's FUNDAMENTALS first. Don't bother squat with combos, chances are you won't even get the chance to land them because your normal/natural play isn't going to create the opportunity for you to use the scripted combo.

Learn the fundamentals... ie what stype of game is this? Is it a game which is heavily dependant on the neutral game/footsies? (oldskool SF), or is it a high speed rushdown offensive heavy game? (KOF series, Blazblue, etc). First you must learn how to play with your normals and use them to create opportunities for you to actually use that 'powerful script button'. You can have a combo on tap that does 100% damage, but unless your opponent is totally frigging brain dead, you probably won't get to use that button unless you luck out if you cannot create the opportunity to use it.

tl;dr learn to walk before you run.... combos is 'running'.

Everything else I pretty much agree with justframe. A combo script not only has to be useful, it has to be practical. There's a reason why we never bother with combos that you only see in combo videos. A lot of these combos require a very specific setup that NEVER appears in a real match. Combos we script tend to be practical before they are flashy.

xamcronus
12th January 19, 13:13
From my perspective as a player who actually performs combos manually before I script them (for my own damn laziness :P), when learning a new fighting game you should always focus on learning the game's FUNDAMENTALS first. Don't bother squat with combos, chances are you won't even get the chance to land them because your normal/natural play isn't going to create the opportunity for you to use the scripted combo.

Learn the fundamentals... ie what stype of game is this? Is it a game which is heavily dependant on the neutral game/footsies? (oldskool SF), or is it a high speed rushdown offensive heavy game? (KOF series, Blazblue, etc). First you must learn how to play with your normals and use them to create opportunities for you to actually use that 'powerful script button'. You can have a combo on tap that does 100% damage, but unless your opponent is totally frigging brain dead, you probably won't get to use that button unless you luck out if you cannot create the opportunity to use it.

tl;dr learn to walk before you run.... combos is 'running'.

Everything else I pretty much agree with justframe. A combo script not only has to be useful, it has to be practical. There's a reason why we never bother with combos that you only see in combo videos. A lot of these combos require a very specific setup that NEVER appears in a real match. Combos we script tend to be practical before they are flashy.

Thanks KS I 100% agree with you. Very helpful. I appreciate all your comments guys :thumbsup: